Life Saving Medicine?

The benefits of preventing disease with a vaccine far outweigh the risks.


Vaccination is not just a personal choice. The vaccinated community helps to protect those who are not vaccinated, a concept known as “herd immunity” or “community immunity.”


Turns out Vaccines are good for you!

Vaccines are a staple of modern civilization.


Because of the inoculation of vaccines through the general public, diseases such as Mumps, Pertussis, Smallpox, Rubella, and Polio have been mostly eradicated, with less than 20,000 cases annually combined. This is a whopping 91%-100% decrease from 20th century pre-vaccination cases. Vaccines don’t just protec you, but also the people around you. The concept of herd-mentality ensures that the spread of deadly diseases are halted.


Recently, a movement known as Anti-Vaxxers have been gaining a following. Whether for religious and ethical reasons or pure skepticism, Anti-Vaxxers are individuals who firmly believe that vaccines are more of a detriment than a help. They claim various ways that vaccines can negatively impact human physiology.


Anti-vaxxers often believe that:

  • Vaccines cause mental and physical disabilities such as autism, neurological disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.
  • Vaccines and their ingredients possess substances that were not meant for human processing.
  • Vaccines are pointless in a developed, first-world country. Standards in hygiene and medical practices are enough to curb diseases.


All of these claims have since been widely debunked by researchers and professionals in the science and medical field. Yet this hesitancy to vaccinate continue to grow. Vaccination hesitancy and reluctance could pose a potential threat for the general population. If too many people in a community were to not be vaccinated, once-eradicated diseases can reappear in a stronger form.


This site was created in light of the recent Measles Outbreak that has originated in our home of Clark County. As of Feb. 24th, there are now 62 confirmed cases. While this outbreak has put Vancouver on the map in an embarrassing way, this event can be examined and serve as an example for those who have yet to vaccinate.

We hope this site can be a stepping stone for those reluctant or hesitant to vaccinate.

Do your research. Be open to reason and data. Please consider your children (and their rights), peers, community, and the bigger picture.

All information gathered here.

All licensed and recommended vaccines go through years of safety testing before becoming available for use. Vaccines go through several cycles of clinical trials. More information here

While concerns over substances such as formaldehyde, mercury, and aluminum are valid, these ingredients pose a threat to the human body in certain levels. The FDA insures that trace amounts are used for approved vaccines. Interestingly enough, the human body produces more formaldehyde than the amount found in modern vaccines.

Vaccines help your immune system fight infections. Vaccines are made of very small amounts of weak or dead germs that won’t make you sick. This is for your immune system to “archive” this harmful germ. The next time your body is invaded by this same type of germ, your immune system will sound the alarms and respond to the infection. More information here.

This widespread fear of vaccines causing Autism originated from a since-discredited article published by Andrew Wakefield in 1997. In the article, Wakefield claims that the MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) vaccine was increasing autism in British children. The paper was rife with ethical violations, financial conflict of interests, and errors. Recent research conducted by the CDC provides evidence that Autism forms in utero, well before any vaccinations can be inoculated. More information here.

While these could help slow the progress of germs, some respiratory diseases can spread through the air. More information here.

While natural immunity results in a stronger immune system for some cases, the risk usually outweighs the benefits. By exposing yourself to disease, you endanger yourself and everyone around you. For example, contracting measles could mean a 1 in 500 chance of death from resulting symptoms. By just inoculation of the MMR vaccine, the chance of death is 1 in 1,000,000 for relatively the same immunity.